oh F***

I’m torn. Really seriously torn. I want to give these kids kudos. I want to congratulate them and wish them luck at the Grammies. I want to thank them for raising awareness about the dangers of sugars and how eating unhealthy can/will lead to obesity and other health issues.

The thing is – I can’t. I can’t congratulate them, wish them luck or thank them because of one of the last text slides after their video.

diabetesphoto

No indication as to what form of Diabetes the creators are targeting.

Hear is the info shared beneath the video on YouTube – (which you can only see if you expand the text by clicking “Show More”) HERE is the link to the video.

“In PUSHIN’ WEIGHT, directed by Jamie DeWolf, Simone Bridges makes the metaphorical connection between the Food Industry, High Sugar foods and the pushing of drugs on our streets. Youth Speaks and UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations are leading the campaign against Type 2 Diabetes with our new project, The Bigger Picture. Raise your voice TODAY!”

The “Type 2 Diabetes” is not in bold in the text under the video – I altered the quote to raise a point. This is the only place the phrase “Type 2 Diabetes” is used.

I won’t even go into how wrong I think it is overall to be suggesting that Type 2 Diabetes is caused simply by unhealthy eating. There are other reasons Type 2 Diabetes happens too.

But I am a parent of 3 children with Type 1 Diabetes. My kids did not get diabetes because I pumped them full of sugar, corn syrup, bacon and fat. I fight often to educate people about how Type 1 Diabetes happens and first and foremost how it has nothing to do with what I fed my kids or what I ate while pregnant.

I am proud of these kids. I’m glad they created a PSA video. I just wish they didn’t include “Diabetes” in their slides or if they really felt it necessary – they could have listed Type 2 Diabetes as one of many health problems that can be caused by poor food choices.

How did I come to find this *gem of a video. An email I received from “The Daily Good”. I get daily emails from “Good” and most are worth the read/watch. I was excited at first when I saw the subject line of today’s email.

“Watch This Diabetes PSA – Could Probably Win a Rap Grammy” 

Here is the text from the email I received which included a link to the video I shared above.

“Highlighting how today’s sugar consumption is similar to drug addiction, Youth Speaks and UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations have teamed up with high schoolers to raise important questions about healthy food access with provocative PSAs about diabetes. Their campaign, The Bigger Picture, gives youth opportunities to not only show-off their creative skills, but also win educational scholarships.”

Click HERE to learn more about The Daily Good. Most the stuff I receive is *Good, today’s was an exception not a norm.

I do hope these kids receive educational scholarships. Their video is quite good. But still – it didn’t need to focus on diabetes – any kind. And honestly – for shame UCSF for not recognizing how this video could have a negative impact on how hard those of us in the Type 1 community (and all of the DOC) work to educate others.

I find it ironic that this is my first post of 2014 and follows behind my daughters guest post about the boy in her class that suggested he would get diabetes from eating too much sugar.

Happy friggen New Year.

 

Diabetes In A Cup

First, let me apologize for not having blogged in some time. 2013 started off crazy busy, then there was the flu that took down my boys and me, followed by a week of catch up with life, followed by a great visit with friends from TX that included sneaker waves, boobie cars, and stupid dune yard people. I wish I could explain all of the shenanigans but some stuff is better left unexplained.

So what prompted a great need to blog today a week ago? Ignorance and Youth. (yes I started this a week ago – someone please stop the merry-go-round – I’m getting dizzy)

My dear daughter has guitar lessons each Thursday evening. Unfortunately those lessons take place during the same hour that DSMA hosts DSMA Live a Blog Talk Radio show with amazing guests and hosts. Sorry I digress – although you should totally check out the show which is on Thursdays at 8pm central time. You can find links on the DSMA webpage.

Ok so each Thursday while my daughter is in her lesson I step next door to the coffee shop (you know the one). Nearly every Thursday the same baristas are working. The manager has learned my name as well as  my favorite drink and she greets me kindly while pulling a venti cup for me while the younger gal rings up my order. Both are very friendly and my drink is always spot on delicious.

The young one – (oh to be young and have only 2 decades of footprints on the earth) is sweet and always smiling but alas she has no filter between her brain and her mouth. I’ve witnessed her naivety and her immaturity numerous times with regards to sharing too much personal information about her boyfriend and how painful her nose piercing was.

Her willingness to share a bit more than most, and her lack of awareness of the people (guests) around her never bothered me. I shrugged it off – she is young.

Until – last night while fixing up a number of blended mocha caramel frappa type drinks she refered to them as “diabetes in a cup”. She wasn’t talking to me but when I hear diabetes my ears perk up since it is a language I speak. I was reading an email while I waited for another employee to grind my coffee.  She was talking to the other employee. That employee didn’t hear her (or chose to ignore her) because she said it again – “Yup, Diabetes in a cup”. Of course at the second mention of it I inquired as to what she was referring. She explained she was making drinks for her boyfriend and his mom since it was the end of her shift and they requested she bring them drinks. She explained the ingredients and again said – “so its diabetes in a cup”. (Im not sure the coffee company would be excited about her renaming items on the menu.)

diabetesinacupphoto

HUH???

At this I said, “I have two kids with diabetes.”

Of course she stopped in her tracks and looked at me like a 2-year-old caught reaching into a candy jar. Then she opened and closed her mouth a couple of times, clearly unsure of what to say before she finally said “oh I’m sorry”.

I told her they have Type 1 diabetes which isn’t caused by eating too much sugar. Which she replied with, “so they were born with it.”

I explained – No, not born with it. They developed it years later at different ages. They didn’t get it from eating the wrong things though. It’s an autoimmune disease. They didn’t do anything wrong to get it and I assure you I wasn’t giving my 2-year-old mocha caramel frappas. There are different types of diabetes but you should also know that some people get Type 2 diabetes without being overweight or eating poorly.

Of course then she told me her grandpa has diabetes.

Ok – out of curiosity I asked “Which kind?”

She didn’t know. I then asked if her grandpa uses insulin.

She said, “Oh no, it’s not that bad.” (Yes I cringed)

Thus I said, “ok well if he doesn’t use insulin which is a medicine that allows people with type 1 and many with type 2 to stay alive than I would guess he has Type 2”

Her response – “I don’t think so, he’s not fat.”

(Didn’t I already cover the fact that a person doesn’t have to be overweight to have diabetes – was she not listening – I’m educating her – she should listen)

During our conversation she was kind, polite, respectful. She apologized numerous times. Although at this point she was glancing at the now melting frappas sitting in the drink holder waiting to be taken to others. I wanted to let her off the hook but needed her to understand her words affect others.

I told her (after her 5th apology) – “I’m not mad. I know you didn’t mean anything by what you said. But I hope you will consider what you say in the future. For all you know someone else overhearing your remarks could have diabetes or love someone with diabetes.”

At this point she thanked me. Im not sure exactly what for. Perhaps for not tattling to her manager. Perhaps for educating her. Perhaps for imparting a real world lesson about filtering ones thoughts before allowing them to escape via the mouth. Perhaps for just letting her off the hook and allowing her to leave.

I hope she heard listened to something of what I said. She is young and has so much to learn about – well everything. She is also kind and meant no harm and while I was angry about it initially I understand why she said what she said. The general public – (which until Feb 7th of 2007 included me) isn’t educated enough about diabetes. Commercials, adds, even crack pots like Dr. Oz don’t share facts effectively.

More education is needed about diabetes. Pediatric doctors and school health offices need posters hanging in the exam rooms that share the symptoms of Type 1 (this would save lives), primary care physicians need to provide nutritional counseling to adult patients (not after a person is found to be at risk but before) and Hollywood needs to learn about diabetes before including it in TV shows, reality shows, and movies. IMHO.

 

Best Betes Blogs

What is the end result of a fabulous Diabetes meet-up aside from love and laughter?

A suggestion, nay request that I host the Best Betes Blogs for November. What could I say after Sara brought me a bottle of sand and shells from Florida. I didn’t realize what a fabulous honor and treat it would be to host. Imagine how thrilled I was to receive over two pages of nominated blogs. For an undisclosed amount of time (wouldn’t want ya thinking hosting takes up too much of your time) I laughed, cried and had to fight off feelings that I’m certain even Dr. Bruce Banner would have succumbed to.

Enough of my rambling – on to the winners of the November Best Betes Blogs

Best Use of Humor

If diabetes had an address I’d like to send some hate mail. Life: One unit at a time

Best Vlog

I’ve always believed that PWD and those who love PWD are the bravest, smartest, funniest and most awesome people – clearly PWD also make great poets. Dorkabetic

Best Recipe

YUM! You had me at “The summer of tomatoes” A Girls Reflections 

Best Use of Photography

Nothing brings me more joy than seeing a family coming together to support one another while building diabetes awareness. The We Cara Lot Blog

Best Advocacy

I’m not sure who said it but someone once said that more people fear public speaking than death. This little man with the support of his mom wasn’t afraid. Type 1 diabetes 365 and here (to watch the presentation) Kuddos Craig!

Best Story of a D Meet-up

Social Media brings people who may have previously felt isolated together – and not only to sing 80’s music together – although I personally believe singing 80’s music together is reason enough. Simon at Simon From the 70’s

Best non-D Related Post

In the Diabetes Online Community we come together to celebrate diabetes success, learn new diabetes management tricks, and share diabetes frustrations – BUT if I’ve learned anything it isn’t always about diabetes support – it is just about support. George at Ninjabetic 

Best Post by a Type 1

Not to scare off any potential BBB hosts but this category was truly difficult to pick a winner. If it were allowed there would be at least a four-way tie. Alas – I was given permission for a two-way tie. I must have read each of the posts submitted a half-dozen times – yes it was that hard to choose.

The questions we all get asked and the decisions regarding how much to share. Nikki at Celiabetes 

Diabetes fights like a jealous sibling or pet when baby comes home. Jacquie at Typical Type 1

Best Post by a Type 2

This post surprised me. As a parent of two kids with Type 1 I always feel people with Type 2 get all the attention via mainstream media. To an individual everything is perception but perception isn’t everything – look closer. That’s what I learned from this post. Sue at RFamHere’s Ramblings

Best Post by a Type Awesome

Courage – she’s got it. Insulin Resilience

Best Post by a LADA/Type 1.5/Not otherwise specified

I’m NOT trying to plug my blog here I just feel the need to say – Stick with it sugar, it never gets easier – you get better. Katie at 1 Little Prick

Best story of a D-mistake

When I got to this category I must say I wasn’t feeling a lot of love for a certain someone. Asking me to choose a winner with so many great nominations was asking a bit much. Thus again I narrowed it down to two and considered flipping a coin but luck isn’t what makes these bloggers so fabulous – it is the ability to act in the presence of fear, recognize that we learn from our mistakes, and to take each day with a spoon full of sugar  – or a whole lot of fast acting carbs when needed.

Lea at Luvleamum

Bram at Trained by Insulin

Best Motivational Post

When reading this post I was thinking about the courage post listed above and my favorite quote about courage – “Courage is not the absence of fear but the ability to act in the presence of fear” Mikes guest post on Diabetes Mine

Best Diabetes Art

Don’t eat Dr. Banting! Wendy at Candy Hearts

Congratulations to all of November’s Best Betes Blogs Winners. Please grab this button to use on your blog if you would like.

Thank you to all those who nominated posts this month and congratulations to those who were nominated.

George Ninjabetic

Scully Can.D.Gal

Kim Texting My Pancreas

Karen Bitter Sweet

Denise My Sweet Bean and her Pod

Brian Buzz Buzz Not My Cell

Scott B Diabetes Daily

Kelly Diabetesaliciousness

YDMV 

Jess Me and D

D-meanderings

Christina Stick With It Sugar

Meri Our Diabetic Life 

Rachel Probably Rachel

Emma Big Purple Duck

C’s Life with D

Kerri Six Until Me

Kate Sweet Success

T Minus Two

Carey dLife

Alexis I Run On Insulin

Victoria Cumbow

Food Food Body Body

Ryan The Diabetic Cyclist

Stephen S Happy-Medium

Rachel Tales of Rachel

Mike Diabetes Mine

Scott E Rolling in The D

Laura Four Days to Two D

Sarah M. La Osita’s Weblog

Sara Moments of Wonderful

Jasmine Silver-Lined

The Unintentional Conversation

Today is Day 3 of the National Health Blog Post Month

The NHBPM prompts are great and I’m thankful for them but I had a untentional conversation today that I’d rather share.

Today my dear daughter was selling Girl Scout Fall Product (nuts and chocolate) outside the local grocery store. I’m sure y’all have seen the Girl scout tables in the winter with the cookies – well here in CA they do the same for fall product. Good times.

My daughter invited one of the passerby’s to purchase nuts or chocolate. The gentleman inquired if there was a low sugar or sugar-free version of chocolate. My daughter said “no sorry but we have nuts” The man replied “no – guess they (girl scouts?) don’t like diabetics. Then he walked away.

My daughter and her fellow girl scout friend (who also walked with us for the JDRF Walk To Cure Diabetes) looked shocked and my daughter a little hurt.

The man had walked over to a group of tables to enjoy his Starbucks. I told the other girl scout mom I was going to go tell him what he had said was hurtful to my daughter. The other mom suggested I not and I considered not walking over but seeing my daughters face pushed me forward.

I approached the man who was reading something on his phone. I apologized that the Girl Scouts do not offer a sugar-free chocolate product. The man waived that away and simply said “Its normal – hard to find a low sugar or sugar-free desert.”

I went on to tell him that the young lady who invited him to purchase fall products is my daughter and has diabetes. He shook his head and said “I shouldn’t have said that. It wasn’t necessary and the girls don’t need to hear it. I’m sorry”.

I was pleased. He got it. Then he went on.

My son was diagnosed with Type 1 when he was 18, he is 31 now. He uses an insulin pump. I’m not taking shots. I try my best with diet, exercise and oral meds, been 5 – wait 9 years now – wow time flies.”

Huh – that surprised me. Here I had pegged him as an angry recently diagnosed person with Type 2. He does have type 2 but I doubt all his frustration comes from his diagnosis. He has spent over a decade hating diabetes – not for him but for his son.

Yes I skipped the NHBPM prompt – but I just thought Id share a conversation that I hadn’t expected. We talked for a good 20 minutes about complications, which type is ‘worse’, what foods cause his sugars to spike more than others (rice btw), how many times he tests a day, and how his son struggled for a good deal of time managing his diabetes prior to getting a pump.

I fully expected an argument when I decided to approach the man. I was ready to berate him for his insensitivity. Turns out I received a lesson about making assumptions.

Post Script –

Have you done the big blue test today? Learn about it now HERE.